Active tracker and passive tracker

Active tracker and passive tracker


The active tracker and the passive tracker collect the data in the same way and are equally accurate. The main difference between these two types of trackers is time.


Active trackers are also known as "real-time" trackers because they send data over satellite or cellular networks to instantly indicate vehicle location. The computer screen can display the movement of the vehicle in real time. Therefore, if companies want to improve delivery efficiency and understand the on-site driving situation of employees, then active tracking is the best choice. The active tracker also has a "geo-fence" capability (thinking this function as a "force field") that provides a warning signal when the car enters or leaves a predetermined location. In addition, such systems can help prevent theft of vehicles or the recovery of stolen vehicles. Of course, active GPS tracking devices are more expensive than passive tracking devices and require monthly service fees.

Passive trackers are cheaper, but data storage is limited, but they are smaller and easier to hide. Passive trackers store information on the device instead of sending data to a remote location. This tracker must be taken off the vehicle and connected to the computer to view the information stored in it. This type of system is suitable for people who track miles for work purposes and for businesses that want to reduce vehicle abuse. In addition, passive trackers are often used to monitor the actions of people (imagine as detective work). Passive trackers are a good choice if you don't need immediate feedback, but check device data regularly.

No matter which type of tracker is, it is inherently portable and has a relatively small form factor. Therefore, battery power is required, and a backup function is required to save data in the event of a power outage. Since charging a battery (usually a single-cell Li-ion battery) requires a higher automotive system voltage and a larger current, a switch-mode charger is desirable because of the switching mode charger charging efficiency compared to a linear battery charging IC. Higher, less heat is generated in the form of power consumption. In general, the input voltage for embedded automotive applications can be as high as 30 V, and some even higher. In these GPS tracking and positioning systems, a charger and a common 12 V to single-cell Li-Ion battery (typically 3.7 V) for much higher input voltages (when voltage transients originating from battery drift occur) Additional protection and some type of backup capability will be the ideal configuration


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